Mike in Manila - Technology Notes

Sunday, August 20, 2006

Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF): ‘Philippines 9 dead in Dengue epidemic?’

August 20th, 2006t

Reports from the wire services seem to say something we have NOT heard pronounced yet in the official circles about an epidemic.- there have been epidemics in the past.

Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), a potentially lethal complication, was first recognized in the 1950s during the dengue epidemics in the Philippines and Thailand, but today DHF affects most Asian countries and has become a leading cause of hospitalisation and death among children in several of them. “ -WHO


- Dengue haemorrhagic fever: diagnosis, treatment, prevention and control
Information on dengue, including a list of those countries where outbreaks have occurred
- Dengue

People I work with; and those I know have had several cases reported in many schools around metro manila - and elsewhere - some have also had these cases heard of in large numbers in Malabon and Pangasinan yet there seems to be no major effort to raise an alarm.

More so say experts because the best thing here is for people not to panic - Dengue is curable if caught in time - but it is not something to be taken lightly.

[] …” Pangasinan dismisses dengue fears
ABS CBN News, Philippines -Health officials in Pangasinan have allayed fears of a dengue outbreak after at least nine people died of dengue in the last six weeks, ANC reported Sunday. ... ” []

[] …” Dengue epidemic kills 9 in Philippines
People's Daily Online, China -At least nine people were killed by a dengue epidemic in the province of Pangasinan 150 kilometers north of Manila in the past six weeks, the Philippine News ” []

While Government seems to be taking the issue as part of the usual season of dengue - it is after all endemic to the country - what is it ? Why is there not so many worries? Well medical reports do clearly show that if tested properly and taken care of at first notice the survival rate is high - with less than 1% resulting in death. But, that is the key- early detection - survival rate is 80 per cent if not taken into consideration and treated at home. the bottom line is those who are more affected are those people who in the danger group.

The world health organization has extensive information on the disease - and also the information that all parents should be aware of or those who have senior citizens in their homes since the two elderly and very young are the most susceptible to the disease.


Dengue fever is a severe, flu-like illness that affects infants, young children and adults, but seldom causes death.

The clinical features of dengue fever vary according to the age of the patient. Infants and young children may have a non-specific febrile illness with rash. Older children and adults may have either a mild febrile syndrome or the classical incapacitating disease with abrupt onset and high fever, severe headache, pain behind the eyes, muscle and joint pains, and rash.

Dengue haemorrhagic fever is a potentially deadly complication that is characterized by high fever, haemorrhagic phenomena–often with enlargement of the liver–and in severe cases, circulatory failure. The illness commonly begins with a sudden rise in temperature accompanied by facial flush and other non-specific constitutional symptoms of dengue fever. The fever usually continues for two to seven days and can be as high as 40-41°C, possibly with febrile convulsions and haemorrhagic phenomena.

In moderate DHF cases, all signs and symptoms abate after the fever subsides. In severe cases, the patient’s condition may suddenly deteriorate after a few days of fever; the temperature drops, followed by signs of circulatory failure, and the patient may rapidly go into a critical state of shock and die within 12-24 hours, or quickly recover following appropriate volume replacement therapy.


There is no specific treatment for dengue fever. However, careful clinical management by experienced physicians and nurses frequently saves the lives of DHF patients. With appropriate intensive supportive therapy, mortality may be reduced to less than 1%. Maintenance of the circulating fluid volume is the central feature of DHF case management.

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Friday, August 18, 2006

Help Lebanon:Manila based aid group for OFW’s & Lebanese

At a meeting held in Manila’s Makati district groups of Filipino & Expat organizations are working together to seek out ways they can Helpl

The goal is to find ways to assist people in Lebanon by doing their part to make themselves available for those people in need. It’s not Politics, here or there.

But just people trying to help those both from there and here and families they worked for… Or companies that provided lively-hood to thirty thousand filipino’s get back on their feet.

In so many disasters here in the Philippines I have covered - both the man made and natural kind - people in places in Lebanon and the middle east did their part by making donations to the red cross and red crescent to assist people in the Philippines in their time of need - so now this group says it is time for them in their own way to their part. As those who can in some way or service or kind do their part to help people there regardless of ideology or faith or political color rebuild their lives after this war that has brought so much of the tragic things that Wars brings - they hope to do their part as well.

MikeinManila gives it’s space- to this and re-posts here the link and ways to reach this group.

God Bless all…



Honorary Consulate of Lebanon, Manila

Philippine National
Red Cross

With the assistance of
International SOS

IConnect Inc.

Lebanon: saving lives and restoring human dignity

The ongoing conflict in Lebanon is a human catastrophe with hundreds of civilians reported dead, thousands injured and hundreds of thousands displaced. The Lebanese Red Cross Society, through the efforts of its volunteers and with the full support of the ICRC, continues to help the most vulnerable. A report from the ICRC’s Marko Kokic and Ayad Al Mounzer of the Lebanese Red Cross.

A long prayer rings out through loudspeakers across the centre of Beirut. The sombre tone is in keeping with the city’s mood. Streets normally packed with people and traffic remain quiet. Many shops are closed. In the few that remain open, televisions bring today’s news of another day of fighting, another day of horror.

Images of dead and injured civilians caught in the crossfire and the heroic efforts of Lebanese Red Cross paramedics feature on the news bulletins every day. First on the scene, volunteer paramedics rescue the living and recover the dead. Their work is fraught with peril, with only the Red Cross emblem to protect them.

A recent incident proved just how dangerous their work can be. A rocket tore through the roof of an ambulance transporting the injured. It blew a melon-sized hole through the centre of the Red Cross emblem on top of the ambulance. Paramedics suffered minor wounds but a patient lost his leg in the incident.

Red Cross paramedics transport the seriously injured to Beirut’s hospitals. Thousands of civilians have already been wounded. One of them is nine-year old Samah Chihab who is recovering in Beirut Governmental University Hospital. A bomb cut her down as she played in front of her house in the town of Tyre.

The hospital is modern and well equipped but understaffed.

“We have received medical supplies, but no direct medical assistance,” explains Assistant General Manager, Bilal Masri, “Right now we are working at thirty percent of our capacity in terms of human resources because staff have been unable to reach the hospital”.

Many people have already fled raging battles in the south while others remain trapped. Leaving can be as dangerous as staying. Bombed cars litter the road leading south. Some still contain bodies but the security situation in many areas is still too dangerous for Red Cross volunteers to recover them.

An estimated million civilians have been displaced, many taking shelter in schools and other public buildings. Hassan Mohammed Abadi and his family are camped out in a school on Mount Lebanon near Beirut. They arrived only days ago from their southern village of Yatir where they remained amidst the fighting for almost two weeks. When it became unbearable they took a chance and fled, taking only what they could carry.

For those who are seeking to *restore* *contact* *with family members* who may have been impacted by the conflict, please click *HERE *to go to the International Committee of the Red Cross special web site called Family Links.

If you are reading this in a country other than the Philippines and wish to contribute to this effort, kindly contact the RED CROSS or RED CRESCENT society in you country of residence. For a complete list of Red Cross and Red Crescent societies throughout the world, please click *HERE*.

All donations are handled by the Philippine National Red Cross and are coursed
through the International Committee of the Red Cross to the Red Cross in Lebanon.
Donations are used solely by the Red Cross for humanitarian purposes.

For details on how you can HELP LEBANON!,
call the HELP LEBANON! HOTLINE at +632-6334060.
The HELP LEBANON! HOTLINE is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.